About Us


Our Ethos and Pay What You Decide.

The Thrown Gauntlet Festival was set up with political intent; we wanted to take away all boundaries to seeing and exhibiting art, bring the community together around art in unusual but domestic places, and to show what can be done by a small team with solidarity and determination. We are throwing down the challenge (as the festivals name alludes) to ourselves, to artists and to a residential community to question the domestic norms and to question how we use and imagine spaces and how we consider and value places.

We feel strongly that, in order to issue such a challenge, to demand such a possibility, we must set an example. Hence, you are invited into our homes to see what you find there.

The curated works have been selected from an open application process and represent artistic expressions from a diverse range of individuals and groups.

We are a team made up artists and producers, students and graduates, collectives and individuals, who all believe passionately that that the sharing of experiences, in a direct and personal way, is vital to a social dialogue. It is dialogue and conversation of shared experience that we want to offer. To this end, we have worked and liaised with local groups, councillors, art collectives and residents to consider all the people involved in our community and communities. A main tenet of the festival is to engage people in their community. We hope that the presence of the unusual, of art in homes and our invitation in will encourage conversations amongst the eclectic mix of residents in Falmouth and the surrounding county.

But improving access to art and community spirit goes beyond creating space for new and young artists to exhibit in unusual domestic settings, putting them as close to familiar and unfamiliar audiences as possible.



Pay What You Decide

The festivals admission is gained through a Pay What You Decide (PWYD) method, where people offer what they think the festival is worth for their payment.
Different people place different values on their experiences (of art and generally) and one effect of a set ticket prices is it demeans the ability of the individual to designate value. It shows a lack of trust and as such undermines the individuals experience (as it is experienced in relation to this set financial price rather). It destroys the specificity and individuality of the 'individual experience' itself.
For us PWYD addresses this problem. We trust, (and want) you to consciously decide how important such projects and festivals are to you and contribute accordingly. We think you are utterly capable of this action.

For our part, if everyone pays around the £3 mark we should be fine financially, but it is for you to decide.

We will publish our entire budget, expenses and incomes after the festival.
Additionally we will publish a short evaluative report.
Any profit generated will go towards developing the festival, it's ethos and it's ambition.